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Posts Tagged ‘100 best Beatles songs’

At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1966 song “Here, There and Everywhere”. This Paul McCartney composition is 5th track on the first side on my favourite Beatles album, Revolver, which I blogged about here (as it is at number 3 in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums).

“Here, There and Everywhere” was recorded in June of 1966, and the album Revolver was released in August of the same year. Some critics have called it McCartney’s finest love ballad; critic Tim Riley describing it as “the most perfect song” McCartney has ever written. It was one of John Lennon’s favourite Beatles songs, and in 2000 it was rated the 4th greatest song ever by Mojo magazine. It is certainly one of my favourite McCartney songs from this period; and together with “Good Day Sunshine”, it is my favourite McCartney song on Revolver.

At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Here, There and Everywhere".

At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Here, There and Everywhere”.

To lead a better life I need my love to be here…

Here, making each day of the year
Changing my life with the wave of her hand
Nobody can deny that there’s something there

There, running my hands through her hair
Both of us thinking how good it can be
Someone is speaking but she doesn’t know he’s there

I want her everywhere and if she’s beside me
I know I need never care
But to love her is to need her everywhere
Knowing that love is to share

Each one believing that love never dies
Watching her eyes and hoping I’m always there

I want her everywhere and if she’s beside me
I know I need never care
But to love her is to need her everywhere
Knowing that love is to share

Each one believing that love never dies
Watching her eyes and hoping I’m always there

I will be there and everywhere
Here, there and everywhere

Here is a video of this beautiful song. Enjoy!

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At number 26 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1964 song “If I Fell”. This song, composed by John Lennon, is one of my favourites from this period. It features beautiful 2-part harmonies between Lennon and Paul McCartney in the chorus, and is a poignant love ballad; not particularly characteristic of Lennon’s style of writing. In fact, in a 1980 interview Lennon claimed that it was his first attempt at writing a love ballad. If so, he did a pretty good job!

It was recorded in February 1964, and released as the B-side to the single “And I Love Her” in the USA in July of the same year. In the Disunited Kingdom it only appeared on their third album A Hard Day’s Night, it is the third track on the first side of the album. “If I Fell” was released as a single in some other countries, including Norway where it got to number 1.

At number 26 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "If I Fell".

At number 26 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “If I Fell”.

If I fell in love with you
Would you promise to be true
And help me understand
Cos I’ve been in love before
And I found that love was more
Than just holding hands

If I give my heart to you
I must be sure
From the very start
That you would love me more than her

If I trust in you oh please
Don’t run and hide
If I love you too oh please
Don’t hurt my pride like her
Cos I couldn’t stand the pain
And I would be sad if our new love was in vain

So I hope you see that I
Would love to love you
And that she will cry
When she learns we are two
Cos I couldn’t stand the pain
And I would be sad if our new love was in vain

So I hope you see that I
Would love to love you
And that she will cry
When she learns we are two
If I fell in love with you

Here is the video of “If I Fell” from the movie A Hard Day’s Night. Enjoy!

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At number 27 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1965 song “You’re Going to Lose That Girl”. This song was a John Lennon & Paul McCartney collaboration, which was pretty rare by 1965. It was the last song composed for their album Help! before they started filming for the movie of the same name.

“You’re Going to Lose that Girl” features wonderful harmonies. Lennon takes the lead vocal with McCartney and George Harrison harmonising in the responses to Lennon’s vocals. It was recorded in February of 1965, and appears as the 6th track on the first side of the album Help!, which was released in August 1965.

In the USA, the song was originally entitled “You’re Gonna Lose That Girl”, which is what the band actually say; but this was later changed to the same title as its British release. Incidentally, as far back as 1963 the Beatles were using “americanisms” in their songs, with “yeah, yeah, yeah” in their 1963 song “Please Please Me” being an obvious example. This was just following the American music to which they had listened whilst growing up, but at the time McCartney’s father remarked on this, suggesting that they should sing “yes, yes, yes” instead!

At number 27 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "You're Going to Lose That Girl".

At number 27 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “You’re Going to Lose That Girl”.

You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl
If you don’t take her out tonight
She’s going to change her mind
And I will take her out tonight
And I will treat her kind

You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl
If you don’t treat her right, my friend
You’re going to find her gone
Cos I will treat her right, and then
You’ll be the lonely one

You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl
I’ll make a point
Of taking her away from you, yeah
The way you treat her what else can I do?

You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl
I’ll make a point
Of taking her away from you, yeah
The way you treat her what else can I do?

If you don’t take her out tonight
She’s going to change her mind
And I will take her out tonight
And I will treat her kind
You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl
You’re going to lose that girl

Here is a video of this lovely song. Enjoy!

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At number 28 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is George Harrison’s 1969 masterpiece “Here Comes the Sun”, one of my favourite Beatles songs. This song was composed by Harrison during a difficult time when the Beatles were frequently bickering. One day, Harrison decided to play truant from a planned business meeting at the band’s Apple Corps organisation. Instead, he went to see his friend Eric Clapton; the song was composed in Clapton’s garden. According to Clapton, it was April 1969.

“Here Comes the Sun” was recorded over the summer of 1969, and appears as the first track on the second side of their 1969 album Abbey Road, which was released in September 1969. The song was never released as a single, although it has gone on to be one of Harrison’s best known compositions.

At number 28 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Here Comes the Sun".

At number 28 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Here Comes the Sun”.

Here comes the sun, here comes the sun
And I say it’s all right

Little darling, it’s been a long cold lonely winter
Little darling, it feels like years since it’s been here

Here comes the sun, here comes the sun
And I say it’s all right

Little darling, the smiles returning to the faces
Little darling, it seems like years since it’s been here

Here comes the sun, here comes the sun
And I say it’s all right

Sun, sun, sun, here it comes
Sun, sun, sun, here it comes
Sun, sun, sun, here it comes
Sun, sun, sun, here it comes
Sun, sun, sun, here it comes

Little darling, I feel that ice is slowly melting
Little darling, it seems like years since it’s been clear

Here comes the sun, here comes the sun
And I say it’s all right
Here comes the sun, here comes the sun
It’s all right, it’s all right

I cannot find a video of the Beatles’ version of Here Comes the Sun on YouTube, but I have found this version of George Harrison performing it live in concert. Enjoy!

 

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At number 29 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1964 song “Can’t Buy Me Love”. This song was recorded in January and February 1964, and released in March of the same year as the A-side of their sixth single in the Disunited Kingdom, with “You Can’t Do That” as the B-side. It also features in the Beatles’ first movie A Hard Day’s Night, and as the last track on the first side of their third album A Hard Day’s Night.

“Can’t Buy Me Love” is a Paul McCartney composition, with John Lennon making essentially no contribution to its writing. It was composed whilst the Beatles were staying at the George V hotel in Paris, during an 18-day residency playing at the Olympia Theatre in the city.

In the wake of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” getting to number 1 in the USA, the Beatles felt a great deal of pressure to consolidate on this success. “Can’t Buy Me Love” was written under this pressure, and recorded quite quickly. With the Beatles playing 3 live shows a day in Paris, they were as tight musically as they ever had been.

At number 29 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Can't Buy Me Love".

At number 29 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Can’t Buy Me Love”.

I’ll buy you a diamond ring my friend if it makes you feel alright
I’ll get you anything my friend if it makes you feel alright
Cos I don’t care too much for money, and money can’t buy me love

I’ll give you all I got to give if you say you’ll love me too
I may not have a lot to give but what I got I’ll give to you
I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love

Can’t buy me love, everybody tells me so
Can’t buy me love, no no no, no

Say you don’t need no diamond ring and I’ll be satisfied
Tell me that you want the kind of thing that money just can’t buy
I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love
Owww

Can’t buy me love, everybody tells me so
Can’t buy me love, no no no, no

Say you don’t need no diamond ring and I’ll be satisfied
Tell me that you want the kind of thing that money just can’t buy
I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love

Can’t buy me love, love
Can’t buy me love

Here is a video of this song, it is taken from the A Hard Day’s Night movie. Enjoy!

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At number 30 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1965 song “We Can Work It Out”. I previously blogged about this song here, as part of my series of blogs about the 4 Christmas number 1s the Beatles had in the Disunited Kingdom during their time together (1963, 1964, 1965 and 1967); this song was number 1 for Christmas 1965. As I mentioned in that blog, “We Can Work It Out” was the first double-A sided single to be released, along with the flip-side “Day Tripper”.

“We Can Work It Out” was a true collaboration between John Lennon and Paul McCartney, at a time when they were collaborating less and less. McCartney wrote the verses and the chorus, but Lennon wrote the lyrics and melody of middle part “Life is very short…..”.

At number 30 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "We Can Work it Out".

At number 30 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “We Can Work it Out”.

Try to see it my way,
Do I have to keep on talking till I can’t go on?
While you see it your way,
Run the risk of knowing that our love may soon be gone
We can work it out,
We can work it out

Think of what you’re saying
You can get it wrong and still you think that it’s alright
Think of what I’m saying,
We can work it out and get it straight, or say good night
We can work it out,
We can work it out

Life is very short, and there’s no time
For fussing and fighting, my friend
I have always thought that it’s a crime,
So I will ask you once again
Try to see it my way,
Only time will tell if I am right or I am wrong
While you see it your way
There’s a chance that we may fall apart before too long
We can work it out,
We can work it out

Life is very short, and there’s no time
For fussing and fighting, my friend
I have always thought that it’s a crime,
So I will ask you once again
Try to see it my way,
Only time will tell if I am right or I am wrong
While you see it your way
There’s a chance that we may fall apart before too long
We can work it out,
We can work it out

Here is the official video of this song, from the Beatles vevo account. Enjoy!

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At number 32 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Penny Lane”. This song was released in February 1967 on a double-A sided single along with “Strawberry Fields Forever”. “Penny Lane” is a Paul McCartney composition, with “Strawberry Fields Forever” being a John Lennon composition.

McCartney wrote it as a reaction to Lennon’s song, wanting to show that he too could write about their childhood in Liverpool, just as Lennon had done so wonderfully in “Strawberry Fields Forever”. This competitiveness against each other inspired each to greater heights throughout their time in the Beatles.

“Penny Lane” relates scenes from an actual street in Liverpool, a street which McCartney would walk or take a bus along on a regular basis. If you go on the Beatles tour in Liverpool the tour bus will take you along Penny Lane and you see the barber shop and the bank and other landmarks mentioned in the song.

At number 32 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Penny Lane".

At number 32 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Penny Lane”.

Penny Lane there is a barber showing photographs
Of every head he’s had the pleasure to know.
And all the people that come and go
Stop and say “Hello”.

On the corner is a banker with a motorcar,
And little children laugh at him behind his back.
And the banker never wears a mac
In the pouring rain, very strange.

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes.
There beneath the blue suburban skies
I sit, and meanwhile back
In Penny Lane there is a fireman with an hourglass,
And in his pocket is a portrait of the Queen.
He likes to keep his fire engine clean,
It’s a clean machine.

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes.
A four of fish and finger pies
In summer. Meanwhile back
Behind the shelter in the middle of the roundabout
The pretty nurse is selling poppies from a tray.
And though she feels as if she’s in a play,
She is anyway.

In Penny Lane the barber shaves another customer,
We see the banker sitting waiting for a trim,
And then the fireman rushes in
From the pouring rain – very strange.

Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes.
There beneath the blue suburban skies
I sit, and meanwhile back.
Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes.
There beneath the blue suburban skies
Penny Lane!

“Penny Lane” is one of my favourite McCartney songs. Its lyrics create a wonderfully vivid image of some of the characters from McCartney’s childhood in Liverpool, and melodically it shows the increasing complexity in the Beatles’ songs.

Here is a video of one of this evocative song. Enjoy!

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