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Posts Tagged ‘1966’

At number 18 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Tomorrow Never Knows”, the last track on their 1966 Revolver album. This song is pure John Lennon. It is, in my opinion, a simply stunning song, and one of my favourite Beatles songs. It has all kinds of weird effects which would become a staple of so many other bands’ music over the next few years. One could argue that “Tomorrow Never Knows” is the first psychedelic track, fuelled by Lennon’s frequent tripping on LSD. It gave a hint of what was to come from the Beatles in 1967.

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At number 18 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Tomorrow Never Knows”

Lennon did all kinds of trickery in this song, with the help of their producer George Martin. There are backwards loops of music, droning-type sound effects, and part of the inspiration for this song was Tibetan chanting. It is one  of the most “ahead of its time” pieces of music that I can think of.

Turn off your mind, relax and float down stream
It is not dying, it is not dying

Lay down all thoughts, surrender to the void
It is shining, it is shining

Yet you may see the meaning of within
It is being, it is being

Love is all and love is everyone
It is knowing, it is knowing…

… that ignorance and hates may mourn the dead
It is believing, it is believing

But listen to the colour of your dreams
It is not living, it is not living

So play the game “Existence” to the end…
… Of the beginning, of the beginning
Of the beginning, of the beginning
Of the beginning, of the beginning
Of the beginning, of the beginning

Here is a video of this stunning song. I hope the link stays working for a while. Enjoy!

Which is your favourite song on Revolver?

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At number 22 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Eleanor Rigby”. This Paul McCartney composition was recorded in April and June 1966, and released on 5 August 1966 as a double A-side single with “Yellow Submarine”. It is also the the second track on the first side of my favourite Beatles album, Revolver. In fact, in the Disunited Kingdom the single “Eleanor Rigby”/”Yellow Submarine” was released on the same day as Revolver, but in the USA Revolver was released 3 days after the single, on 8 August.

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At number 22 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Eleanor Rigby”.

“Eleanor Rigby” is an exquisite song, certainly one of my favourite Paul McCartney songs. The lyrics are beautiful and haunting, and the use of  a double string quartet showed that the band were evolving beyond the confines of a normal “pop” group, with just a guitar-based sound. The musical arrangement was done by George Martin, the Beatles’ producer.

Ah look at all the lonely people
Ah look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby, picks up the rice
In the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window, wearing the face
That she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie, writing the words
Of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working, darning his socks
In the night when there’s nobody there
What does he care

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah look at all the lonely people
Ah look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby, died in the church
And was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie, wiping the dirt
From his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

It seems that all the postings of the original Beatles version of “Eleanor Rigby” have been removed from YouTube. I have found this video of the song, which is from the opening sequences of the animated movie Yellow Submarine, but it may get removed.

http://en.musicplayon.com/play?v=556898

You can also find the song on most of the streaming services. Enjoy!

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At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is their 1966 song “Here, There and Everywhere”. This Paul McCartney composition is 5th track on the first side on my favourite Beatles album, Revolver, which I blogged about here (as it is at number 3 in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums).

“Here, There and Everywhere” was recorded in June of 1966, and the album Revolver was released in August of the same year. Some critics have called it McCartney’s finest love ballad; critic Tim Riley describing it as “the most perfect song” McCartney has ever written. It was one of John Lennon’s favourite Beatles songs, and in 2000 it was rated the 4th greatest song ever by Mojo magazine. It is certainly one of my favourite McCartney songs from this period; and together with “Good Day Sunshine”, it is my favourite McCartney song on Revolver.

At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Here, There and Everywhere".

At number 25 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Here, There and Everywhere”.

To lead a better life I need my love to be here…

Here, making each day of the year
Changing my life with the wave of her hand
Nobody can deny that there’s something there

There, running my hands through her hair
Both of us thinking how good it can be
Someone is speaking but she doesn’t know he’s there

I want her everywhere and if she’s beside me
I know I need never care
But to love her is to need her everywhere
Knowing that love is to share

Each one believing that love never dies
Watching her eyes and hoping I’m always there

I want her everywhere and if she’s beside me
I know I need never care
But to love her is to need her everywhere
Knowing that love is to share

Each one believing that love never dies
Watching her eyes and hoping I’m always there

I will be there and everywhere
Here, there and everywhere

Here is a video of this beautiful song. Enjoy!

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At number 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest songwriters is Holland-Dozier-Holland, referring to Lamont Dozier and brothers Brian and Eddie Holland. These three were contracted to the Motown record label from 1962 and wrote songs for the artists singing on that label. They helped define the sound of Motown, and of soul music in that decade.

Some of the many songs they wrote are the 1963 hit “Heat Wave” (sung by Martha and the Vandellas), the 1963 hit “Can I Get a Witness” (sung by Marvin Gaye), the 1965 hit “Stop! In the Name of Love” (sung by The Supremes), the 1966 hit “You Can’t Hurry Love” (sung by Diana Ross and The Supremes and which I blogged about here) and the 1969 hit “Give Me Just a Little More Time” (sung by Chairman of the Board, which I blogged about here).

At number 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest songwriters of all time is Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland.

At number 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest songwriters of all time is Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland.

The songwriting partnership followed more traditional lines than e.g. John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Dozier and Brian Holland would write the music and produce the songs, and Eddie Holland would write the lyrics and arrange the vocals. In 1968 their contract with Motown ended, by which time they had fallen out with the label’s founder and owner Berry Gordy. They continued to write together after leaving Motown, but in 1973 Dozier left their partnership to pursue a solo recording career.

The song I have decided to share in this blogpost is their 1966 song “Reach Out I’ll Be There”, which was a hit for The Four Tops.

Now if you feel that you can’t go on (can’t go on)
Because all of your hope is gone (all your hope is gone)
And your life is filled with much confusion (much confusion)
Until happiness is just an illusion (happiness is just an illusion)
And your world around is crumbling down, darlin’

(Reach out) Come on girl reach on out for me
(Reach out) Reach out for me
Hah, I’ll be there with a love that will shelter you
I’ll be there with a love that will see you through

When you feel lost and about to give up (to give up)
‘Cause your best just ain’t good enough (just ain’t good enough)
And your feel the world has grown cold (has grown cold)
And your drifting out all on your own (drifting out on your own)
And you need a hand to hold, darlin’

(Reach out) Come on girl, reach out for me
(Reach out) Reach out for me
Hah, I’ll be there to love and comfort you
And I’ll be there to cherish and care for you

(I’ll be there to always see you through)
(I’ll be there to love and comfort you)

I can tell the way you hang your head (hang your head)
You’re not in love now, now you’re afraid (you’re afraid)
And through your tears you look around (look around)
But there’s no peace of mind to be found (no peace of mind to be found)
I know what your thinking
You’re a loner, no love of your own, but darling

(Reach out) Come on girl reach out for me
Reach out, just look over your shoulder
I’ll be there to give you all the love you need
And I’ll be there you can always depend on me
I’ll be there

Here is a video of this fantastic song. Enjoy!

 

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At number 35 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Paperback Writer”. This song was written mainly by Paul McCartney, with some contribution from John Lennon, but as usual is credited as Lennon-McCartney, as all their songs were during the Beatles period. It was recorded in April 1966, and released as a single in May (USA) and June (DUK) of the same year. It was the A-side of the single, with the B-side being Lennon’s “Rain”.

To be honest, this is not one of my favourite Beatles songs. In fact, I much prefer “Rain”, it is a far more inventive and interesting song in my opinion. Although “only” a B-side, “Rain” also features in the Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs, at number 88.

At number 35 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Paperback Writer".

At number 35 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Paperback Writer”.

If you read the caption to the song, George Martin (their producer) certainly praises the song highly. But, as I say, this is one of my least favourite songs of theirs from 1966, and I am a much bigger fan of the more psychedelic “Rain”, the B-side to this single.

 

Dear Sir or Madam, will you read my book?
It took me years to write, will you take a look?
It’s based on a novel by a man named Lear
And I need a job, so I want to be a paperback writer
Paperback writer

It’s the dirty story of a dirty man
And his clinging wife doesn’t understand
His son is working for the Daily Mail
It’s a steady job but he wants to be a paperback writer
Paperback writer

Paperback writer

It’s a thousand pages, give or take a few
I’ll be writing more in a week or two
I can make it longer if you like the style
I can change it round and I want to be a paperback writer
Paperback writer

If you really like it you can have the rights
It could make a million for you overnight
If you must return it, you can send it here
But I need a break and I want to be a paperback writer
Paperback writer

Paperback writer

Paperback writer, paperback writer
Paperback writer, paperback writer
Paperback writer, paperback writer
Paperback writer, paperback writer (fade out)

 

The first video I have included here is the entire song.

But, this second video is a colour video of the Beatles performing the song. They were one of the first bands to release videos, as they did not have time to make live appearances to promote their songs on TV shows. Unfortunately, this YouTube clip is not the entire video, just the first minute of the song.

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At number 37 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 100 greatest Beatles songs is “She Said, She Said”. This song was written by John Lennon, and was inspired by a conversation he had with actor Peter Fonda during an LSD trip in August 1965 at a house the band had rented in Beverley Hills, California. It was recorded in June 1966 and appears as the last song on the first side of The Beatles’ 1996 album Revolver (an album I blogged about here at it is at number 3 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums).



At number 37 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "She Said, She Said".

At number 37 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “She Said, She Said”.



Peter Fonda later recalled that day in August 1965, when he and The Byrds visited The Beatles at their rented house, in an interview with Rolling Stone Magazine.

It was a thoroughly tripped-out atmosphere because they kept finding girls hiding under tables and so forth: one snuck into the poolroom through a window while an acid-fired Ringo was shooting pool with the wrong end of the cue.



As I’ve said before, Revolver is my favourite Beatles album, and “She Said, She Said” is one of my favourite songs on that album. Here are Lennon’s fantastic lyrics.

She said, “I know what it’s like to be dead.
I know what it is to be sad.”
And she’s making me feel like I’ve never been born

I said, “Who put all those things in your head?
Things that make me feel that I’m mad.
And you’re making me feel like I’ve never been born.”

She said, “You don’t understand what I said.”
I said, “No, no, no, you’re wrong.
When I was a boy everything was right,
Everything was right.”

I said, “Even though you know what you know,
I know that I’m ready to leave
‘Cause you’re making me feel like I’ve never been born.”

She said, “You don’t understand what I said.”
I said, “No, no, no, you’re wrong.
When I was a boy everything was right,
Everything was right.”

I said, “Even though you know what you know,
I know that I’m ready to leave
‘Cause you’re making me feel like I’ve never been born.”

She said, “I know what it’s like to be dead.
I know what it is to be sad.
I know what it’s like to be dead…”


Here is a video of this wonderful song. Enjoy!





Which is your favourite song on Revolver?

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Today I thought I would start a count down of Rolling Stone Magazine’s 100 greatest Beatles songs. I have decided not to count down the whole 100, as if I do one of the songs in the list once a week it is going to take two years! So, I will do the top 50, which is till going to take a year.

Starting at number 50 is “Got To Get You Into My Life”. This Paul McCartney song is off the Beatles’ 1966 album <em"Revolver, which I blogged about here. The song is a bit of a homage to Motown, with a very colourful brass section and upbeat tempo typical of the Motown hits of the day.



At number 50 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Got To Get You Into My Life".

At number 50 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Got To Get You Into My Life”.




I was alone, I took a ride
I didn’t know what I would find there
Another road where maybe I could see another kind of mind there

Ooh, then I suddenly see you
Ooh, did I tell you I need you
Every single day of my life

You didn’t run, you didn’t lie
You knew I wanted just to hold you
And had you gone you knew in time we’d meet again
For I had told you

Ooh, you were meant to be near me
Ooh, and I want you hear me
Say we’ll be together every day

Got to get you into my life

What can I do, what can I be
When I’m with you I want to stay there
If I’m true I’ll never leave
And if I do I know the way there

Ooh, then I suddenly see you
Ooh, did I tell you I need you
Every single day of my life

Got to get you into my life
Got to get you into my life

I was alone, I took a ride
I didn’t know what I would find there
Another road where maybe I could see another kind of mind there

Then suddenly I see you
Did I tell you I need you
Every single day?


Here is a video of this great song. Enjoy!





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