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Posts Tagged ‘French Open’

Yesterday (Sunday 5 June) Novak Djokovic won the French Open and became the first player since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four majors at the same time. He also joined a small group of players who have won all four majors, but to hold all four at the same time is much rarer. As anyone who has read my blogposts about tennis knows, I am massive fan of Rod Laver, and I don’t want to take anything away from his remarkable achievement of doing the Grand Slam (winning all four majors in the same calendar year) twice, in 1962 and 1969.

But, for anyone today to win all four majors is far more difficult, and I don’t mean because there are more tennis players competing, although there are. It is because now all four majors are played on different surfaces, which was not the case in Laver’s day. When Laver won his two Grand Slams three of the four majors were on grass. The only one which wasn’t was the French Open. So, if you were an expert grass-court player, as Laver was, it was much easier to win three of the majors than it is today. This only adds to Djokovic’s remarkable achievement of being the first player since Laver to hold all four majors at the same time. Federer has never achieved it, nor Nadal, nor McEnroe, nor Sampras, nor Agassi. None of them.

Novak Djokovic won his first French Open. He now holds all four major titles at the same time, the first player to achieve this since Rod Laver in 1969

Andy Murray won the first set 6-3, but after that Djokovic started to cut the errors out of his game and the next three sets went to Djokovic pretty quickly, 6-1, 6-2 and 6-4. Murray just had no answer for Djokovic once the latter got his game into gear.

Djokovic has now won 12 major titles, and if he carries on like this who would bet against him surpassing Federer’s record of 17 major titles? Also, as the French Open is his second major of 2016, he is on track to do the Grand Slam, winning all four majors in the same calendar year. Again, the last person to do this was Rod Laver, in 1969.

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It is one of the biggest upsets in Wimbledon history. Rafa Nadal, recently crowned as the seven times winner of the French Open (the most ever), lost in the 2nd round of Wimbledon last night. He lost to an unknown from the Czech Republic by the name of Lukas Rosol. I missed the 1st set, but saw the match from that point on. Rosol narrowly lost the 1st set on a tie-breaker, after apparently having 3 set points. But, he went on to win the 2nd and 3rd sets to take a 2-1 lead.

Rafa Nadal winning his 7th French Open title in June 2012

Nadal fought back to win the 4th set, so levelled the match 2-2. By this time it was closing in on 9pm, so the Wimbledon officials made the sensible decision to close the roof and allow play to continue into the early part of the night. Closing the roof and getting the humidity down with the air-conditioning system means a delay of about 30 minutes, which only added to the tension.

When the players came back on court, it was Rosol who came out of the blocks the quickest, continuing the high level of tennis he had played in all but the 4th set. It is not that Nadal played badly, but Rosol outplayed him, and thoroughly deserved his win.

Lukas Rosol beats Nadal in one of the biggest upsets in recent Wimbledon history.

This is probably the biggest upset at Wimbledon (at least in the men’s tournament) since 1996, the year Dutchman Richard Krajicek beat Pete Sampras in the quarter finals, the only defeat Sampras suffered at Wimbledon between 1993 and 2001, during which time he won 7 titles (the most ever at Wimbledon).

My own current favourite player, Roger Federer, hopes to equal Sampras’ record; he currently has won 6 Wimbledon titles in his 16 Major titles, and I am sure would dearly love to equal and then pass Sampras’ Wimbledon record so he can go down at the greatest Wimbledon champion in history.

Roger Federer showing his 16 Major titles (6 Wimbledon, 1 French Open, 5 US Open and 4 Australian Open)

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