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Posts Tagged ‘Paul McCartney’

At number 44 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 100 greatest Beatles songs is “All My Loving”. This is very much a Paul McCartney song, and given that it was written whilst on tour with Roy Orbison in early 1963, it is one of the earliest Beatles songs which had so little input from the other writing partner in the Lennon-McCartney partnership. It appears on their second album With The Beatles, the third track on the first side. It was not released as a single in either the Disunited Kingdom or the U.S., and yet it managed to get to number 44 in the U.S. Billboard charts, purely based on imports of the single which was released in Canada!



At number 44 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "All My Loving".

At number 44 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “All My Loving”.



The song has, for a love song, quite a rocky rhythm to it, thanks to John Lennon’s rhythm guitar. When Paul was writing the song, he had in mind a country and western song.


Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you
Tomorrow I’ll miss you
Remember I’ll always be true
And then while I’m away
I’ll write home every day
And I’ll send all my loving to you

I’ll pretend that I’m kissing
The lips I am missing
And hope that my dreams will come true
And then while I’m away
I’ll write home every day
And I’ll send all my loving to you

All my loving I will send to you
All my loving, darling I’ll be true

Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you
Tomorrow I’ll miss you
Remember I’ll always be true
And then while I’m away
I’ll write home every day
And I’ll send all my loving to you

All my loving I will send to you
All my loving, darling I’ll be true
All my loving, all my loving ooh
All my loving I will send to you


Here is a video of this song. Enjoy!



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At number 45 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 100 greatest Beatles songs is “No Reply”, which appears on their fourth album Beatles for Sale, in fact it is the opening track of the first side. One of the things I like most about this song is the wonderful tone of John Lennon’s voice; it sounds slightly nasal and harmonises beautifully with Paul McCartney’s in the chorus. According to Wikipedia, Lennon, who mainly wrote the song although it has some input from McCartney, originally intended to sing the higher part of the harmony in the chorus, but his voice had deteriorated due to excessive use (probably too much touring and live performing), and so he and McCartney switched in the chorus with Lennon singing the lower part.



At number 45 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "No Reply".

At number 45 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “No Reply”.



The song talks of an unfaithful girlfriend, the person in the song suspects his girlfriend is seeing someone else. It shows a different, more vulnerable and less confident side to Lennon, or at least in the character he is playing in his songs. If you haven’t listened to Beatles for Sale (or haven’t listened to it in a while) then I urge you to do so; it is a wonderful album with great songs and beautiful harmonising from Lennon, McCartney and George Harrison.


This happened once before
When I came to your door
No reply
They said it wasn’t you
But I saw you peep through your window

I saw the lie, I saw the lie

I know that you saw me
As I looked up to see your face
I tried to telephone
They said you were not home
That’s a lie
‘Cause I know where you’ve been

I saw you walk in your door
I nearly died, I nearly died
Cause’ you walked hand in hand
With another man in my place

If I were I’d realise that I
Love you more than any other guy
And I’ll forgive the lies that I
Heard before when you gave me no reply

I’ve tried to telephone
They said you were not home
That’s a lie
‘Cause I know where you’ve been
I saw you walk in your door
I nearly died, I nearly died

‘Cause you walked hand in hand
With another man in my place
No reply, no reply


Here is a video of this great song. The only working one I could find on YouTube is from The Beatles cartoon series, and so there is a bit of cartoon fun before the song 🙂 And, this video has not been up long, so it may stop working soon 😦 Enjoy!





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At number 47 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 100 best Beatles songs is “Things We Said Today”, which is from their fourth album “A Hard Day’s Night”, released in 1964 to coincide with the film of the same name.



At number 47 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is "Things We Said Today".

At number 47 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest Beatles songs is “Things We Said Today”.



McCartney wrote this song about Jane Asher, to whom he was engaged for a while (and whose brother Tony Asher co-wrote the Beach Boys’ song “God Only Knows”, which I blogged about here, with Brian Wilson). Apparently it was Asher and her family who got McCartney listening to classical music, and so e.g. the strings which became quite prominent in his music about 1965 came about because of this influence.

As usual the song is attributed to Lennon and McCartney, but as far as I am aware John Lennon played no part in the writing of this song. It certainly strikes me as being pure McCartney, but not as soppy as some of his efforts. Like most songs in this top 100 list, it was never released as a single by The Beatles.


You say you will love me
If I have to go
You’ll be thinking of me
Somehow I will know
Someday when I’m lonely
Wishing you weren’t so far away
Then I will remember
Things we said today

You say you’ll be mine, girl
Till the end of time
These days such a kind girl
Seems so hard to find
Someday when we’re dreaming
Deep in love, not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today

Me, I’m just the lucky kind
Love to hear you say that love is luck
And though we may be blind
Love is here to stay and that’s enough

To make you mine, girl
Be the only one
Love me all the time, girl
We’ll go on and on
Someday when we’re dreaming
Deep in love, not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today

Me, I’m just the lucky kind
Love to hear you say that love is luck
Though we may be blind
Love is here to stay and that’s enough

To make you mine, girl
Be the only one
Love me all the time, girl
We’ll go on and on
Someday when we’re dreaming
Deep in love, not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today


Here is a video of this wonderful song. Enjoy!





Which is your favourite song from “A Hard Day’s Night”?

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At number 418 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 500 greatest albums of all time is “Band On The Run” by Paul McCartney and Wings. The list from 420 to 411 is as follows:


  • 420 – “The “Chirping” Crickets” by Buddy Holly and the Crickets (1957)
  • 419 – “Dummy” by Portishead (1994)
  • 418 – “Band On The Run” by Paul McCartney and Wings (1973)
  • 417 – “Boy” by U2 (1980)
  • 416 – “Mule Variations” by Tom Waits (1999)
  • 415 – “Van Halen” by Van Halen (1978)
  • 414 – “Beauty and The Beast” by The Go- Go’s (1981)
  • 413 – “Doubles Nickels on The Dime” by Minuteman (1984)
  • 412 – “Pink Flag” by Wire (1977)
  • 411 – “461 Ocean Boulevard” by Eric Clapton (1974)


The only one of these albums I own is “Boy” by U2, although I do own other albums from the ones listed here by Paul McCartney, Tom Waits and Eric Clapton. I also have songs by Buddy Holly and Van Halen; and I have heard of Portishead and The Go-Go’s, but don’t own anything by them. I have no idea who Minuteman or Wire are.

Rather than blog about U2’s “War”, I’ve decided to blog about the only other album in this list with which I am familiar, “Band On The Run” by Paul McCartney and Wings. This is Paul McCartney’s most successful post-Beatles album, and many people think it is his best post-Beatles work. It reached number 1 in both the Disunited Kingdom and the USA.



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At number 418 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 500 greatest albums is “Band On The Run” by Paul McCartney and Wings.



Paul McCartney was the first Beatle to announce that he had left the band, which he did in April 1970. In reality, The Beatles had pretty much split up the previous year, after the recording of “Abbey Road” (which I blogged about here). John Lennon had lost interest in playing with his bandmates, preferring to spend his time doing projects with Yoko Ono and playing with new musicians in a loose collection he referred to as The Plastic Ono Band. George Harrison was also spending more and more time pursuing his own projects, both solo and with other musicians. But, it was McCartney who made the demise of The Beatles official by announcing that he had split from the band in April 1970.

One of the many bones of contention between McCartney and his fellow Beatles was that McCartney wanted to go back on tour, something The Beatles had not done since their ill-fated tour of 1966, when amongst other things they received death threats in the United States because of John Lennon’s “we are more popular than Jesus” comment. After recording solo albums in 1970 (“McCartney”) and early 1971 (“Ram” ), McCartney formed a new band which he called Wings. The first album recorded by Wings was “Wildlife”, released in December 1971. In early 1972 McCartney took his new band on tour, playing in university Student Unions and travelling around in a van.

“Band On The Run” was released in 1973, and was the third album released by Wings. The track listing of the original Disunited Kingdom version of the album was

  1. “Band on the Run”
  2. “Jet”
  3. “Bluebird”
  4. “Mrs Vandebilt”
  5. “Let Me Roll It”
  6. “Mamunia”
  7. “No Words”
  8. “Picasso’s Last Words (Drink to Me)”
  9. “Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five”

The US version of the album included the additional track “Helen Wheels” between tracks 7 and 8 above, making 10 tracks on the US version. The song “Band on the Run” was the fourth single to be released from the album, and to my mind is one of the best Wings songs McCartney composed. The song reached number 1 in the USA and number 3 in the DUK.


Stuck inside these four walls, sent inside forever,
Never seeing no one nice again like you,
Mama you, mama you.
If I ever get out of here,
Thought of giving it all away
To a registered charity.
All I need is a pint a day
If I ever get out of here.

Well, the rain exploded with a mighty crash as we fell into the sun,
And the first one said to the second one there I hope you’re having fun.
Band on the run, band on the run.
And the jailer man and sailor sam were searching every one

For the band on the run, band on the run, band on the run, band on the run

Well, the undertaker drew a heavy sigh seeing no one else had come,
And a bell was ringing in the village square for the rabbits on the run.
Band on the run, band on the run.
And the jailer man and sailor sam, were searching every one

For the band on the run, band on the run,band on the run, band on the run

Well, the night was falling as the desert world began to settle down.
In the town they’re searching for us every where, but we never w I’ll be found.
Band on the run, band on the run

And the county judge, who held a grudge
Will search for evermore
For the band on the run, band on the run, band on the run, band on the run


Here is a live version of the song. Enjoy!






Which is your favourite Wings song?

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At number 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums is “Are You Experienced? by the Jimi Hendrix Experience.


No. 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 greatest albums - "Are you experienced" by the Jimi Hendrix Experience

No. 15 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s 500 greatest albums – “Are you experienced” by the Jimi Hendrix Experience


The only Jimi Hendrix album I own is his Greatest Hits album. But in preparation for this blog I have been listening to Are You Experienced? via one of the music streaming services. The Disunited Kingdom release of this album was in May 1967. Hendrix had come to live in London in late 1966, and formed his band The Jimi Hendrix Experience in October 1966. The album was not released until August 1967 in the USA and Canada, as in May 1967 when the DUK version was released Hendrix was virtually unknown in his native US. It was only after heavy promotion by The Beatle’s Paul McCartney that Hendrix got to play at the Monterey Pop Festival in June, and on the back of this his music became better known in the USA over the summer of 1967.

The UK version of this album released in May 1967, the “original” album, has 11 tracks

  1. Foxy Lady
  2. Manic Depression
  3. Red House
  4. Can You See Me
  5. Love or Confusion
  6. I Don’t Live Today
  7. May This Be Love
  8. Fire
  9. Third Stone from the Sun
  10. Remember
  11. Are You Experienced?

The US and Canadian version released in August 1967 also had 11 tracks, but some are different

  1. Purple Haze
  2. Manic Depression
  3. Hey Joe
  4. Love or Confusion
  5. May This Be Love
  6. I Don’t Live Today
  7. The Wind Cries Mary
  8. Fire
  9. Third Stone from the Sun
  10. Foxy Lady
  11. Are You Experienced?

The US version had three songs which had been single hits in the UK, “Purple Haze”, “Hey Joe” and “The Wind Cries Mary” added, but had the three songs “Red House”, “Can You See Me” and “Remember” removed to make way for these UK hits. So the original US version was more of a compilation album than the UK version. Not surprisingly, the album referred to by Rolling Stone Magazine is the US version.

Because I am really only familiar with Jimi Hendrix’s better known songs, the only song I knew beforehand on the UK version was “Foxy Lady”, but on the US version I also knew the three hits mentioned above.

What can one say about Jimi Hendrix? His guitar playing is unique, there will probably never be another guitar player like him. I don’t know how to play the guitar, but I can only imagine that Hendrix was some kind of technical genius with it. Generally I am not a huge fan of cover versions, particularly if I know the original first. But Hendrix’s version of Bob Dylan’s All Along The Watchtower is so different from Dylan’s bare acoustic original that I like it very much. It doesn’t compete with Dylan’s version because it is so different. The story is that he performed his version of Dylan’s masterpiece within some 48 hours of the song being released. It illustrates wonderfully Hendrix’s guitar playing.

Hendrix was so ahead of his time, over 40 years on his guitar playing still doesn’t seem to have been equalled by anyone else. But what it must have sounded like to people in 1966-67 hearing it for the first time I can only imagine.

Here is the only song I knew from this album which is on both the UK and US versions, “Foxy Lady.



Which is your favourite Jimi Hendrix song?

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In the opening line to “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band“, Paul McCartney sings “It was 20 years ago today, Sgt Pepper taught the band to play.” Well, 50 years ago today, this little know band from Liverpool released their first single – “Love Me Do”. They of course went on to become the most successful musical act in history.



Enjoy!



When did you hear your first Beatles song?

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