Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Taxman’

At number 3 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums is “Revolver” by The Beatles. As I said in my blog about “Abbey Road”, the last album that The Beatles recorded, “Revolver” is my favourite Beatles’ album. To me, this album is simply perfection, there is not a weak song on it. Even the McCartney songs are amongst his best, with songs like the groovy “Gotta Get You Into My Life”, the sublime “Eleanor Rigby” and the beautiful “Here, There and Everywhere”. This is McCartney at the top of his game.



At number 3 in Rolling Stone Magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums is "Revolver" by The Beatles.

At number 3 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums is “Revolver” by The Beatles.



There are three songs by George Harrison on “Revolver”, the first of which, “Taxman” opens the album, something Harrison had not been granted before. One of his other songs on this album is the Indian-music infused “Love You Too”, which is my favourite Indian-influenced song by him. Of the 14 tracks on the album, three were written and sung by Harrison, one Lennon & McCartney song is sung by Ringo – the kids’ favourite “Yellow Submarine” (the first Beatles song I ever remember hearing), 5 songs have McCartney on lead vocal, and 5 have Lennon on lead vocal. Unlike its predecessor, “Rubber Soul”, there is much less two or three-part harmonies on “Revolver”, an indication that the band were going more and more their separate ways.

My favourite songs on this album are the Lennon songs. In particular the incredible “Tomorrow Never Knows”, the Beatles’ first foray into psychedelic music. It is a mesmerising song with surreal lyrics and a complex soundscape which involved hours and hours of work in the studio by the band and their producer George Martin. “I’m Only Sleeping” speaks of Lennon’s insomnia, and “She Said She Said” came from a phrase that actor Peter Fonda apparently kept whispering in his ear at a party – “I know what it’s like to be dead”.

For me, albums don’t get any better than this one. This is the best that there is, bar none!

I thought I would share the opening track with you, George Harrison’s “Taxman”, his swipe at Government taking 95% (yes, ninety five percent) of their income in the mid 1960s. The “Mr. Wilson” and “Mr. Heath” in the lyrics below refer to Harold Wilson, the then British Prime Minister, and Edward Heath, who was leader of the opposition Conservative party at this time.


(1,2,3,4

Hrmm!

1,2…

1,2,3,4.)

Let me tell you how it will be
There’s one for you, nineteen for me
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman

Should five per cent appear too small
Be thankful I don’t take it all
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman

If you drive a car, I’ll tax the street
If you try to sit, I’ll tax your seat
If you get too cold I’ll tax the heat
If you take a walk, I’ll tax your feet

Taxman!
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman

Don’t ask me what I want it for (Aahh Mr. Wilson)
If you don’t want to pay some more (Aahh Mr. Heath)
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman

Now my advice for those who die
Declare the pennies on your eyes
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman

And you’re working for no one but me
Taxman!


Here is a YouTube video of the song. Enjoy!





Read Full Post »