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Posts Tagged ‘Tony Blair’

Towards the end of last week it was revealed that in the Chilcot Inquiry (which is a public inquiry in the Disunited Kingdom into Britain’s role in the Iraq war) the full details of conversations between then Prime Minister Tony Blair and then US President George Bush about the war (including the build up to it) will be kept secret. I think this is nothing short of scandalous.



The story as reported in London's Daily Telegraph

The story as reported in London’s Daily Telegraph



Am I the only one who thinks this is wrong? Tony Blair and his US counterpart George W. Bush served as political leaders of their respective countries, offices into which they were voted by the public. Their salaries were paid for by the taxpayers, and they were public servants, as are all politicians. Edward Snowden’s recent revelations show that the US and DUK governments have been illegally snooping on their private citizens’ communications through the NSA and GCHQ respectively, and yet these public servants somehow have the right to privacy when we don’t? It stinks, that is all I can say.

I strongly believed back in 2001, and I still believe, that the US/DUK invasion of Iraq was illegal under international law. They did not have a UN mandate to invade, and yet both Bush and Blair went ahead and invaded anyway. They did this on the premise that Saddam Hussein had “weapons of mass destruction” (WMDs), something which was subsequently shown to be not true. Somewhere in the build-up to this war lies were made, and I think it is our right to know who made those lies and when. Was it the CIA and British Intelligence who lied to Bush and Blair about the presence of WMDs? Or did Bush and Blair doctor the intelligence to justify their invasion? The Chilcot Inquiry should have been our way to find out, and yet I don’t see that we ever will with this pathetic decision to not reveal the full details of their conversations.

Let me repeat, Bush and Blair were both public servants. They were making decisions to send American and British soldiers into a war where thousands of them died. Not to mention the hundreds of thousands of innocent Iraqis who also died as either collateral damage to the invasion, or in the fighting between Sunni and Shia muslims. Blair and Bush have no right to keep those conversations private, as they were public servants engaged in business which affected the publics of the two countries. I really don’t understand why Chilcot has bowed to the pressure from either the US or DUK governments to not reveal the full details of those conversations, but he should not have given in and the Inquiry is all the poorer for it.

Am I the only one who feels this withholding of all the conversations regarding the Iraq war between those two “leaders” in wrong?

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